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Nursery admission: Supreme Court setback for Delhi’s private schools

COURTESY : INDIA TODAY

The Supreme Court has dismissed a petition from Delhi private schools against a high court verdict concerning fee hike. Upholding the Delhi High Court’s January 2016 judgment, the apex court today ruled that private schools have to obtain approval from the Delhi government before going ahead with their decision to hike fee.

“Once you have taken land from DDA (Delhi Development Authority) you have to abide by the Education Act,” the Supreme Court while dismissing the petition of private schools.

The decision will have an impact on the functioning of more than 400 private unaided schools in the city.

WHAT IS THE CASE

The Delhi High Court in its January 20, 2016 verdict had said that the schools built on land allotted by DDA cannot hike the fee before taking prior permission from Delhi government.

“It is clear that schools cannot indulge in profiteering and commercialisation of school education.Quantum of fees to be charged by unaided schools is subject to regulation by DoE in terms of power conferred under Delhi Schools Education Act of 1973 and it is competent to interfere if hike in fee by a particular school is found to be excessive and perceived as indulging in profiteering,” the court had said.

The judgment came on a PIL filed by advocate Khagesh Jha for an NGO, Justice for all, which had sought that recognised private unaided schools on land allotted by DDA be directed to abide by the stipulation in letter of allotment to take prior sanction of DoE before hiking their fees.

25 feared dead after school bus collides with truck in Uttar Pradesh’s Etah district

COURTESY : TOI

NEW DELHI: At least 25 people including 18 school children were killed and 50 injured as a school bus was hit by a truck on Thursday in Etah district.

The bus was ferrying students to Aliganj’s JS Public School in Etah. Thirty six among the 50 injured are stated to be critical, sources said.

According to eyewitnesses, it took an hour to take out the bodies from the mangled school bus. The victims were identified as students of J S Public school, Aliganj.

The school was open even after the district magistrate declared three days holiday considering the extreme weather.

After the incident, DM, SSP, Aliganj CO and other officials visited the spot and government hospital where the victims were brought.

Anguished by tragic accident in UP’s Etah . I share the pain of the bereaved families & condole passing away of young children: PM Modi

— ANI UP (@ANINewsUP) January 19, 2017

Delhi Nursery Admissions: Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia Orders Action Against Over 50 Private Schools

COURTESY : NDTV

NEW DELHI: Delhi Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia yesterday ordered action against over 50 private schools in the national capital which have been found adopting “arbitrary” and “unreasonable” criteria for nursery admissions. Sisodia, who is also the Education Minister slammed private schools running on DDA land for moving court against the new guidelines on nursery admissions saying the government had formed the new rules in accordance with a Supreme Court ruling of 2004. The AAP government had last year issued a list of 51 abolished criteria including parents’ education, their profession, age, oral test and interview warning schools of strict action.

“On basis of complaints received, over 50 schools have been identified as adopting arbitrary criteria which were abolished by the government last year. Action will be initiated against these schools and they will be guided to remove those criteria,” a senior government official said. While 1400 private schools in the national capital are free to set their own criteria excluding the abolished ones, the government has issued fresh set of guidelines for 298 schools running on DDA land.

Sisodia also hit out at the previous government for not formulating the guidelines for these schools within three months of the apex court ruling in 2004.

“Ideally following Supreme Court’s ruling in 2004 the guidelines for nursery admissions in 298 schools running on DDA land should have been formulated within 3 months. But it did not happen for whatever reason,” he said in his blog. “Now that our government has followed the court ruling and formulated the guidelines, these schools should follow them but they have decided to challenge a Supreme Court judgement before the High Court,” he added.

Delhi Government had last month directed 298 private schools running on DDA land to hold the admission process till new guidelines are announced.

After keeping the admissions process on hold for over a week, the Delhi government announced a fresh set of norms making the distance of the school from the applicant’s residence a major criterion while considering them for admission.

Two groups representing private unaided schools decided to move court challenging a condition in the letter allotting DDA land to them under which admissions have been restricted to the institutions’ locality.

While the Court pulled up the AAP government for coming out with nursery admission norms at the “eleventh hour” leading to “chaos, confusion and wastage of valuable judicial time”, it directed the parents to fill up the application forms of various schools based on the criteria set by them as well as the government.

Delhi Nursery Admissions: Some Private Schools Start The Process, Others Waiting For Government Guidelines

COURTESY : NDTV

NEW DELHI:  Nursery admission in Delhi schools started on January 2 and the parents are still facing troubles with choosing schools for their children. Plenty of complaints have been reported after Delhi nursery admissions kicked off in the beginning of this week. Most prominent among them is the confusion over 298 schools in the capital city. After Delhi Directorate of Education (DoE) notified that schools on public land of Delhi Development Land (DDA) will have new guidelines for nursery admissions, so far, the only thing happened in that front is the meeting between school authorities and the Directorate of Education.

According to reports, those who have attended the meeting informed the government authorities their concerns regarding having two sets of standards for schools in the capital.
Though there was no common admission guidelines published after the meetings, some private schools in the capital have already started admission procedure.

Some schools are waiting for the government guidelines to come regarding the criteria and they have informed the parents about this, Red Roses Public School is one of them. “Pre-School admission for the session 2017-18 has been stopped till further guidelines from Directorate of Education”, Red Roses Public School has said in a notice published in their website.

Amidst all this confusion, parents are worried. Their major concern is; what will happen if they wait for the new guidelines and its aftermath. For the past few years Nursery admissions in Delhi have seen many controversies, with parents taking schools and the government to court over changing rules and guidelines several times.

Meanwhile there were reports suggesting that the Delhi government is planning to do away with the management quota in the nursery admissions. If that happens, the schools and parents may again will be dragged into the court procedures as happened last year in which the schools procured a stay on Delhi government’s decision to end the management quota in school admissions.

According to the education department’s notification, admission forms were available from January 2 and the last date to submit applications is January 23.

The first list of selected candidates, including those waitlisted, along with marks allotted under the point system, will be announced by schools on February 15. The second list, if any, will come out on February 29 and the admission process will close on March 31.

A Beginners’ Guide To Delhi Nursery Admissions

COURTESY: NDTV

Another nursery admission season is here. Parents in Delhi are not taking chances and putting all the efforts to get that single seat for their child. Since the whole procedure is full of tension, confusion and scrambling, here, we are trying to make things a bit simpler.

Criteria and Rules

All you may here in the process, mostly, are criteria and rules.

There were three major criteria till last year, neighborhood, alumni (parents as alumni) and siblings (siblings attending the same school). After Delhi Directorate of Education (DoE) notified that schools on public land will have new guidelines before starting nursery admissions, so far, it is not clear about the criteria the DoE is planning to adopt. Speculations are rife; the government may come out with the neighborhood and distance criteria, which are in adherence with the Right to Education Act.

Last year, Delhi government had abolished criteria based on parents’ education, occupation, and lifestyle. Some schools had come out with bizarre list of banned criteria like non-smoking parents and non-alcoholic parents.

So, when you apply for a school, be sure about criteria for which the schools allot more points.

Schools

Which school you are selecting is also important. Getting admitted in a nursery of a prominent school will somehow assure your child best and standard education in the future. So, look for fee, infrastructure, distance to school, academic standard and curricula, and the popularity of the school as yardsticks to register in a school.

Research

Do your own research before getting you involved in the whole process. Talk to parents who were successful in getting their child admitted in the past. Prepare a list of schools you want your child get registered. Prepare the list of the criteria each school notifies. Compare and analyse the lists.

Registration

Some parents apply to only those schools they wish to see their child study there. But that’s foolishness.

First wise step in this process is; apply to all those schools possible.

Second; block the seat you get in the first place, then wait for other lists to come, including your dream school. You will be able to cancel the first admission, if you are chosen for a better school later.

Another nursery admission season is here. Parents in Delhi are not taking chances and putting all the efforts to get that single seat for their child. Since the whole procedure is full of tension, confusion and scrambling, here, we are trying to make things a bit simpler.

Criteria and Rules

All you may here in the process, mostly, are criteria and rules.

There were three major criteria till last year, neighborhood, alumni (parents as alumni) and siblings (siblings attending the same school). After Delhi Directorate of Education (DoE) notified that schools on public land will have new guidelines before starting nursery admissions, so far, it is not clear about the criteria the DoE is planning to adopt. Speculations are rife; the government may come out with the neighborhood and distance criteria, which are in adherence with the Right to Education Act.

Last year, Delhi government had abolished criteria based on parents’ education, occupation, and lifestyle. Some schools had come out with bizarre list of banned criteria like non-smoking parents and non-alcoholic parents.

So, when you apply for a school, be sure about criteria for which the schools allot more points.

Schools

Which school you are selecting is also important. Getting admitted in a nursery of a prominent school will somehow assure your child best and standard education in the future. So, look for fee, infrastructure, distance to school, academic standard and curricula, and the popularity of the school as yardsticks to register in a school.

Research
Do your own research before getting you involved in the whole process. Talk to parents who were successful in getting their child admitted in the past. Prepare a list of schools you want your child get registered. Prepare the list of the criteria each school notifies. Compare and analyse the lists.

Registration

Some parents apply to only those schools they wish to see their child study there. But that’s foolishness.

First wise step in this process is; apply to all those schools possible.

Second; block the seat you get in the first place, then wait for other lists to come, including your dream school. You will be able to cancel the first admission, if you are chosen for a better school later.

Dates

Knowing the dates is very important. This year, the Delhi nursery admission procedure has already started on January 2 and the last date to submit applications is January 23. The first list of selected candidates, including those waitlisted, along with marks allotted under the point system, will be announced by schools on February 15. The second list, if any, will come out on February 29 and the admission process will close on March 31.

This year, parents will be able to get their doubts cleared as the Directorate of Education has set aside dates for parents to approach schools with grievances. This will be allowed on February 16, 17, and 18.

Knowing the dates is very important. This year, the Delhi nursery admission procedure has already started on January 2 and the last date to submit applications is January 23. The first list of selected candidates, including those waitlisted, along with marks allotted under the point system, will be announced by schools on February 15. The second list, if any, will come out on February 29 and the admission process will close on March 31.

This year, parents will be able to get their doubts cleared as the Directorate of Education has set aside dates for parents to approach schools with grievances. This will be allowed on February 16, 17, and 18.

Delhi Nursery Admissions Start Today, January 23 Last Date To Submit Applications

COURTESY : NDTV

NEW DELHI: Nursery admissions in Delhi began today, in around 1,400 private unaided recognised schools for the next academic session, the Delhi government’s Directorate of Education announced. It, however, does not cover the 285 schools built on Delhi Development Authority or DDA land. These schools will follow separate guidelines on admissions. According to the education department’s notification, admission forms were available from today and the last date to submit applications is January 23.

The first list of selected candidates, including those waitlisted, along with marks allotted under the point system, will be announced by schools on February 15. The second list, if any, will come out on February 29 and the admission process will close on March 31.

This year, parents will be able to get their doubts cleared as the Directorate of Education has set aside dates for parents to approach schools with grievances. This will be allowed on February 16, 17, and 18.

Some private schools publish their own criteria for Nursery admissions and the Directorate of Education of the Delhi government has asked them to follow the rules set by the government.

The “neighbourhood” criterion has been a major point of contention between the government and private schools, and this year the government has threatened to withdraw recognition to them, or to write to the DDA or Delhi Development Authority to cancel their lease if they don’t follow the rules. Some of these schools have said they plan to go to court if the government remains adamant on this.

Nursery admissions in Delhi have seen many controversies, with parents dragging schools and the government to court over changing rules and guidelines several times. Last year, the Delhi High Court had stayed the government’s decision to fix the upper age limit at 4 years and scrapping the management quota in admissions along with 11 other criteria, saying it was issued “without any authority” and was in conflict with an earlier order of the Lieutenant Governor.

After fighting private schools on various issues, the Delhi government has made proposals, including one that does away with the management quota in nursery admissions and prevents private schools from arbitrarily increasing fees. These are pending with the Central government.

Nursery Admissions Begin, Confusion Over Criteria In Over 250 Delhi Schools

COURTESY : NDTV

NEW DELHI:  Parents flocked various schools in the national capital today as the race for nursery admissions began even as confusion prevailed about the criteria in over 250 schools. Delhi government has put on hold admissions in 295 private unaided schools built on land given by the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) as the file sent by it to the L-G office for approval of new guidelines for nursery admission is yet to get nod.

The new guidelines for these schools include implementing a criteria of the distance between applicant’s residence and the school. While these schools will be required to fill 75 per cent of seats with students who live in nearby localities, an official notification is awaited.

Though the admission process is online, parents still visited the schools to have a clarity on certain guidelines, criterion and admission process in the remaining 1,400 private schools.

“We have only read about admissions in newspapers but there is lot of confusion. Though I keep on checking the government website but it doesn’t specify which schools are the ones built on DDA land,” said Ruchika Bhatt, a housewife who visited Ahlcon International School to enquire about admissions.

Rahul Soni, who works as a telecaller, went to Greenfields Public School to verify the criteria.
“I have studied the guidelines in detail but after the admissions for the EWS (Economically Weaker Sections) has been made online there is lot of confusion about what applies where. So I wanted to check whether my understanding of the same is correct or not,” he said.

Priya Bhatti, who went to Amity International School in Saket, said, “They (the school management) sent me back saying they have no instructions from the government about admissions yet. We don’t even know which all schools have kept the admissions on hold so we can apply in the remaining ones,” she said.

Neighbourhood may be only criterion for nursery admissions in Delhi

COURTESY : HINDUSTAN TIMES

The distance between a child’s home and school could be the only criteria for admissions in the coming season, a move that will simplify the procedure but is being questioned by schools.

If the Kejriwal government’s proposal on “neighbourhood criterion” is implemented, some of Delhi’s prominent private schools built on government land will have to follow the norm.

“This time, we are planning to keep distance as the only criterion. This will give equal weightage to all applications as there will be no other criteria,” Atishi Marlena, adviser to the Delhi education minister, told HT.

Typically, Delhi schools follow a point system and “neighbourhood”is one of the parameters that decide the school a child would go to.

Schools would be free to determine the distance but in keeping with the right to education guidelines.

As many as 285 private schools built on DDA land such as GD Goenka Rohini and Vasant Kunj, all Delhi Public School except the one in RK Puram, all Bal Bharti schools and Vasant Valley School would have to follow the norm, Marlena said.

Till last year, “neighbourhood”, alumni – one or both the parents ex-students — and siblings – an elder brother or sister studying in the same school — were the three criteria for which points were allotted.

The Delhi government plans to do away with all norms but the one for distance in the guidelines expected to be released in two weeks, officials said. The admission process begins January.

With parents keen on children starting out in good schools, there is always a scramble for seats in the city’s top private institutions.

Last few years have been chaotic, with parents dragging schools and government to court over norms that were changed several times.

Lieutenant Governor Najeeb Jung, who will have the final word, has welcomed the move but has some reservations.

He pointed out in a note that only 285 of the 1,700 private schools were given land by government on condition of having a say in admissions, sources said.

“He has expressed concern that it might create a subset of schools which have admission polices different from other schools,” sources said.

Jung had asked the government to consults all stakeholders to come up with a transparent and uniform policy.

Deputy chief minister Manish Sisodia, who also holds the education portfolio, was likely to meet parents, teachers and other stakeholders on December 5, sources said.

Schools can impose other criteria but only for seats left vacant after exhausting the neighbourhood norm, Marlena said.

Schools are not happy.

“Schools will suffer as the quality of students may suffer if you have students from one area only. All neighbourhoods don’t have enough number of schools and if distance is fixed, students in many areas will be left with no options,” said a principal on condition of anonymity.

(This article has been borrowed from Hindustan Times and published without editing the content.)

Safety Guidelines for School Children

Guidelines for Children
The advice given below on crossing the road is especially for children. Children should be taught the safety code and should not be allowed on the road alone until they can understand and follow it properly. Children learn by example, so parents and teachers should always follow the Code proprely when going out with their children. They are responsible for deciding at what age children can use it safely by themselves

While Walking to School

  • Always walk on the footpath only. On roads withoutschool-children-to-school footpath, walk on the extreme right hand side of the roads.
  • Do not be impatient on the road. Do not rush or run on the road.
  • Cross only at Zebra crossings, traffic signals, subways, foot over-bridges. Where such facilities do not exist, look for a safe place to cross.
  • At the signal lights, cross only on a clear green signal. If an intersection is controlled by a policeman, traffic warden or RSP cadet, cross only when he signals you to do so.
  • When crossing between vehicles parked on the side of the road, remember that you are not visible to the moving traffic (because the parked vehicles may be taller than you). Stop as you appear from behind the vehicle and look for a safe gap before crossing. Remember, drivers need plenty of time to see you and to slow down and stop.
  • While crossing wide roads that have central islands, always cross in two stages. Cross to the central Island , stop, and cross when the next section is clear.
  • While crossing one-way streets, remember that the traffic will usually be moving in a number of lanes and at higher speeds. Do not cross unless all lanes are clear.
  • Never cross a road at a corner/curve, as the motorist taking the turn will not be able to see you in time.
  • Running across the road is a bad idea, as you may slip and fall.

While going by buschildren-plying-in-school-bus

  • Leave home well in time, so that you won’t have to run to catch the bus.
  • At the bus stand, always follow the queue. Board the bus only after it has come to a halt, without rushing in or pushing others.
  • While in the bus, shouting or making a noise is definitely bad manners. Such behavior can also distract the driver.
  • Do not board or alight at a bus stop other than the one decided by the school. Never board and alight at a red light crossing or unauthorized bus stop.
  • Always hold onto the handrail if standing in a moving bus, especially on sharp turns.
  • Do not sit, stand or travel on the footboard of the bus.
  • Do not put any part of your body outside a moving or stationary bus.
  • Always adhere to the bus safety rules.

women-with-childrenGuidelines for parents of school children

  • Parents are equally responsible for the safety of their children during school journeys.
  • They must ensure that the mode of transport arranged by school or by themselves is absolutely safe.
  • Parents must play the role of vigilant observers. They should note down violations committed by school buses and immediately report to the authorities.
  • Parents must participate in P.T.A. meetings and discuss the safety aspects of their children.
  • While taking their children to school themselves, they should take proper care of their safety.
  • Parents must ensure that the children acquire the right knowledge and skills for safe use of roads. They should teach their children the basic rules of the road, how to walk and cross the road, how to alight and board a bus etc.
  • Parents should not allow their minor children to drive.
  • Parents must also ensure that the right attitude for a law abiding citizen is imparted to their children by the family.
  • Children are very good observers and therefore, parents must set an example by meticulously observing even small traffic rules

Guidelines for teachers for ensuring safety of school children

It is the responsibility of school authorities and the teachers to ensure the safety of school children and also to impart the necessary knowledge, skills and attitude to be a safe road user.

  • Teachers should help develop a responsible attitude towards road use in school children.
  • Teachers should impart essential knowledge about roads and traffic to school children, by:
  • Making them familiar with the rules of road and their importance.
  • By explaining them the causes of accidents involving pedestrians, cyclists and children.
  • Telling them about the cause and extent of pollution due to traffic.
  • Children come to school in various modes of transport. Teachers should ensure that:
  • The children enter and leave the school safely.
  • There is no conflict between pedestrians and vehicles.
  • The vehicles including school buses are parked safely and properly.
  • Children should be supervised and taken care of at the time of alighting and boarding the school bus.
  • Every school bus must be accompanied by a teacher for controlling the children and the bus driver.
  • The teacher should arrange for an alternate bus and keep the children together at one place if the school bus fails to arrive or if there is any problem.
  • There should be regular checking of school buses to ensure compliance with mandatory safety requirements.

If any school bus or any conveyance, by which children come to school, violates traffic rules, the teachers should inform about it to their principal orTraffic Police Control Room at Tel. Nos. 23010101, 23737300

Essentials for a School Bus as ordered by the Hon’ble Supreme Court of Indiasafety-school-bus

  • “School Bus” must be written on the back and front of the Bus.
  • If it is a hired bus, “On School Duty” should be clearly indicated
  • Bus must have a First-Aid-Box.
  • The windows of Bus must be fitted with horizontal grills.
  • There must be a Fire Extinguisher in the Bus.
  • School Name and Telephone No. must be written on the Bus.
  • The doors of the Bus should be fitted with reliable locks.
  • To keep School Bags safely, there should be a space fitted under the seats.
  • There must be an Attendant from the School in the Bus.
  • Any parent/guardian or a teacher may also travel to ensure these safety norms.

The above mentioned points as directed by the Hon’ble Supreme Court of India are mandatory for all school buses. For further details, School managements can contact their nearest Traffic Inspector.

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